Slack: Build a chat bot with Hubot in JavaScript

Slack: Build a chat bot with Hubot in JavaScript

Hubot is an scriptable chat bot framework created by GitHub. The newer version supports JavaScript (ES6+), no more CoffeeScript!

ref:
https://hubot.github.com/
https://slack.dev/hubot-slack/

Installation

$ npm install -g yo generator-hubot

$ mkdir codetengu-bot
$ cd codetengu-bot
$ yo hubot --adapter=slack

You could find all available adapters here:
https://hubot.github.com/docs/adapters/

Slack Token

The next thing you need is a Slack Bot Token (API Token) which looks like xoxb-xxx for your chat bot app. You could create a Hubot app in your Slack workspace to request a token, for instance https://vintachen.slack.com/apps/A0F7XDU93-hubot.

Otherwise, you could also create an universal Slack app, install it to your workspace. In your app settings, under "Install App" section, you are able to find OAuth Tokens for your chat bot. See https://api.slack.com/apps.

ref:
https://api.slack.com/bot-users

Development

$ HUBOT_SLACK_TOKEN=YOUR_SLACK_BOT_TOKEN \
./bin/hubot --adapter slack

I fork a script named hubot-reload-scripts to help you reload your scripts when developing them.
https://github.com/vinta/hubot-reload-scripts

Hear And Respond Messages

Writing your own script
https://hubot.github.com/docs/scripting/

// scripts/your_script.js
// Description
//   Do your shit
//
// Author:
//   Vinta Chen
//
// Commands:
//   * `restart <service>`* - Restart the service
//
const _ = require('lodash');

module.exports = (robot) => {
  robot.hear(/restart ([a-z0-9_\-]+)/i, (res) => {
    robot.logger.debug(`Received message: ${res.message.rawText}`);
    const [ serviceName ] = res.match.slice(1);
    res.send(`Restarting ${serviceName}`);
    doYourShit();
  });
};

Call Slack APIs

robot.slack.channels.info({'channel': res.message.rawMessage.channel})
  .then(apiRes => {
    const purpose = apiRes.channel.purpose.value;
    const topic = apiRes.channel.topic.value;
    res.send(`purpose: ${purpose}`);
    res.send(`topic: ${topic`);
  })
  .catch(apiErr => {
    robot.logger.error('apiErr', apiErr);
  });

ref:
https://slack.dev/hubot-slack/basic_usage#using-the-slack-web-api
https://api.slack.com/methods

Computer Names for Sci-Fi Maniac Developers

Computer Names for Sci-Fi Maniac Developers

The list is collected from books I read, movies I watched, and video games I played.

  • ADA (from Zone of the Enders: The 2nd Runner)
  • Albedo (from Hyperion) --> used for one of my code projects
  • Asurada (from Future GPX Cyber Formula)
  • BrainPal (from Old Man's War)
  • ctOS (from Watch Dogs)
  • Deep Thought (from The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy)
  • Eddie (from The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy)
  • EDI (from Mass Effect) --> used for one of my code projects
  • EVA-00 (from Neon Genesis Evangelion)
  • EVA-01 (from Neon Genesis Evangelion)
  • EVA-02 (from Neon Genesis Evangelion)
  • Fine Till You Came Along (from Culture: Look to Windward)
  • GERTY 3000 (from Moon)
  • GLaDOS (from Portal)
  • HAL 9000 (from 2001: A Space Odyssey) --> used for one of my code projects
  • Jane (from Ender's Game: Speaker for the Dead) --> used for My AirPods
  • JARVIS (from Iron Man)
  • KOS-MOS (from Xenosaga)
  • Limiting Factor (from The Culture: The Player of Games)
  • MAGI (from Neon Genesis Evangelion) --> used for my iPad
  • Melchizedek (from Gunnm Last Order)
  • Mike (from The Moon Is a Harsh Mistress)
  • Of Course I Still Love You (from The Culture: The Player of Games)
  • Pip-Boy 3000 (from Fallout) --> used for my iPhone
  • Project 2501 (from Ghost in the Shell)
  • Samantha (from Her)
  • Skynet (from The Terminator)
  • SAL-9000 (2010: The Year We Make Contact)
  • Sol-9000 (from Xenogears)
  • Sophon (from The Three-Body Problem)
  • Tachikoma (from Ghost in the Shell)
  • TARS (from Interstellar)
  • TechnoCore (from Hyperion) --> used for my Macbook Pro
  • Ummon (from Hyperion) --> used for one of my code projects
  • VIKI (from I, Robot)
  • Wheatley (from Portal)

ref:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_fictional_computers
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Artificial_intelligence_in_fiction

Python with Excel: xlrd, xlsxwriter, and xlutils

Python with Excel: xlrd, xlsxwriter, and xlutils

Libraries

xlsxwriter 的文件寫得比較好

ref:
http://www.python-excel.org/
https://xlsxwriter.readthedocs.org/en/latest/
http://openpyxl.readthedocs.org/en/latest/

Usage

row 是橫排
column 是直排

Default format

import xlsxwriter

workbook = xlsxwriter.Workbook('label_copy.xlsx')

# default cell format
workbook.formats[0].set_font_size(12)
workbook.formats[0].set_text_wrap() # 要加上這個才能正常顯示多行
workbook.formats[0].set_align('vcenter')

ref:
https://xlsxwriter.readthedocs.org/en/latest/format.html

Multiple lines

lines_format = workbook.add_format({
    'align': 'left',
    'font_size': 12,
    'text_wrap': True,
    'valign': 'vcenter',
})

# 或是用 """多行"""
content = 'first line\nsecond line'
worksheet.write(0, 0, content, lines_format)

重點是要加上 text_wrap

ref:
http://stackoverflow.com/questions/15370432/writing-multi-line-strings-into-cells-using-openpyxl

Write to existing excel files

from xlutils.copy import copy as xlutils_copy
import xlrd

rb = xlrd.open_workbook('your_file.xls', formatting_info=True)
wb = xlutils_copy(rb)
ws = wb.get_sheet(0)
ws.write(0, 0, 'Hello World')

ref:
https://stackoverflow.com/questions/2725852/writing-to-existing-workbook-using-xlwt

Examples

ref:
https://xlsxwriter.readthedocs.org/en/latest/examples.html

ipdb: The interactive Python debugger with IPython

ipdb: The interactive Python debugger with IPython

ipdb is an interactive Python Debugger with IPython integration, which features tab completion and syntax highlighting, etc. In layman's terms, ipdb is a better pdb.

ref:
https://github.com/gotcha/ipdb

Usage

$ pip install -U ipdb

ref:
https://pypi.python.org/pypi/ipdb

Add a breakpoint to any place you want to inspect, then run your code.

import ipdb; ipdb.set_trace()

If you use Sublime Text 3, try Python Breakpoints.
https://github.com/obormot/PythonBreakpoints

Useful Commands

Oldest frame is the frame in the stack where your program started; it is the oldest in time; the Newest frame, the other end of the stack, is where Python is executing code and is the current frame of execution.

# help: Print the list of all commands
h

# help: Print help about the certain command
h break

# print: Print the value of the expression
p some_obj
pp some_obj

# Print detailed information about the object
pinfo some_obj
pinfo2 some_obj

# args: Print arguments with their values of the current function
a

# list: List 11 lines of source code around the current line
l

# list: List 11 lines of source code around line 123
l 123

# longlist: List all source code for the current function or frame
ll

# jump: Jump to line 123, skip the execution of anything between
j 123

# args: List all arguments of the current function
a

# step: Execute code line by line, it may jump to another frame when a function call is encountered
s

# next: Execute code line by line, it doesn't enter functions called from the statement being executed
n

# return: Continue execution until the current function returns.
r

# continue: Continue execution, only stop when a breakpoint is encountered
c

# break: List all breakpoints
b

# break: Set a breakpoint at line 123
b 123

# break: Set a breakpoint at line 123 of file.py
b path/to/file.py:123

# break: Set a breakpoint on some_func that will be triggered if some_arg == 0
b some_func, some_arg == 0

# clear: Clear all breakpoints
clear

# where: Print a stack trace
w

# up: Move the current frame one level up in the stack trace
u

# down: Move the current frame one level down in the stack trace
d

# quit: Quit debugging
q

# use ! to run Python code that may conflict with pdb's built-in commands
!r = 123
!r = 123; c = 455

ref:
https://docs.python.org/2/library/pdb.html#debugger-commands
https://docs.python.org/3/library/pdb.html#debugger-commands
https://pymotw.com/2/pdb/
https://pymotw.com/3/pdb/
https://medium.com/instamojo-matters/become-a-pdb-power-user-e3fc4e2774b2

post_mortem

Debugging a failure after a program terminates is called post-mortem debugging.

>>> do_shit(a)
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<stdin>", line 1, in <module>
  File "pdb_post_mortem.py", line 13, in go
    for i in range(self.num_loops):
AttributeError: 'MyObj' object has no attribute 'num_loops'
>>> import ipdb; ipdb.pm()
>>> w

trace

Tracing a program as it runs. In this case, it will enter ipdb when sys.path changes.

import sys

# this function will execute on every line!!!
def trace_sys_path(frame, event, arg):
    if sys.path[0].endswith('/lib'):
        ipdb.set_trace()
    return trace_sys_path

sys.settrace(trace_sys_path)

ref:
https://youtu.be/5XvAVgcbmdY?t=22m51s

Use IPython magic functions in ipdb

Because that ipdb is not a full IPython shell: actually, it provides the same Python Debugger interface as pdb, ipdb lacks many features of IPython, for instance, magic functions. You could use following code to enter a real IPython environment for debugging.

from IPython import embed; embed()

Instead of import ipdb; ipdb.set_trace().

ref:
http://stackoverflow.com/questions/16184487/use-ipython-magic-functions-in-ipdb-shell
https://github.com/gotcha/ipdb/issues/33

MkDocs: Deploy your Markdown documents on GitHub Pages

MkDocs: Deploy your Markdown documents on GitHub Pages

MkDocs is a static site generator that builds modern webpages based on your Markdown documents and a simple YAML file.

ref:
https://www.mkdocs.org/

Here is the website which is generated by MkDocs in this post:
https://awesome-python.com/
https://github.com/vinta/awesome-python

Installation

$ pip install mkdocs

Configuration

in mkdocs.yml

site_name: Awesome Python
site_url: https://awesome-python.com
site_description: A curated list of awesome Python frameworks, libraries and software
site_author: Vinta Chen
repo_name: vinta/awesome-python
repo_url: https://github.com/vinta/awesome-python
theme:
  name: material
  palette:
    primary: red
    accent: pink
extra:
  social:
    - type: github
      link: https://github.com/vinta
    - type: twitter
      link: https://twitter.com/vinta
    - type: linkedin
      link: https://www.linkedin.com/in/vinta
google_analytics:
  - UA-510626-7
  - auto
extra_css:
    - css/extra.css
nav:
  - "Life is short, you need Python.": "index.md"

There are more themes:

in Makefile

site_install:
    pip install -r requirements.txt

site_link:
    ln -sf $(CURDIR)/README.md $(CURDIR)/docs/index.md

site_preview: site_link
    mkdocs serve

site_build: site_link
    mkdocs build

site_deploy: site_link
    mkdocs gh-deploy --clean

Custom Domain for GitHub Pages

in docs/CNAME

awesome-python.com

After deploying your GitHub Page, just pointing your domain to following IPs with DNS A records:

  • 185.199.108.153
  • 185.199.109.153
  • 185.199.110.153
  • 185.199.111.153

ref:
https://help.github.com/articles/setting-up-an-apex-domain/#configuring-a-records-with-your-dns-provider
https://help.github.com/articles/troubleshooting-custom-domains/#https-errors

Automatic Deployment Via Travis CI

You need to

language: python

python:
  - "3.6"

script:
  - cp README.md docs/index.md
  - mkdocs build

deploy:
  provider: pages
  local-dir: site
  skip-cleanup: true
  keep-history: true
  github-token: $GITHUB_TOKEN
  on:
    branch: master

ref:
https://docs.travis-ci.com/user/deployment/pages/